Taylor Martin

 Dec14 cover“India-noplace” and “Naptown” have both been used todescribe Indianapolis, Indiana. Thanks to city planners and cultural benefactors, Indianapolis is no longer the town in the middle of a cornfield. Visitors have found the city teeming with a variety of arts and entertainment, thanks in part to individuals like Taylor Martin; his life’s goal is to make Indianapolis the Midwest Mecca for magical arts. “Taylor Martin is one of those people whom every city should have,” says Tracy Forner, co-host of Indy Style, a morning show on Channel 8 in Indianapolis.

 

Now in its seventh year, Taylor Martin’s Indy Magic Monthly is located in the heart of the theatrical district of Massachusetts Avenue in downtown Indy. IMM presents local, national, and international magic acts in a 120-seat arena theater. Audiences enjoy local performers such as Dan Dygert, Glamente, Doug Jave, and Patrick Smith. National and international acts have included Eugene Burger, ICE McDonald, Jeff McBride, Jay Scott Berry, and Vincent Hedan. Every month is a different show. Magicians extraordinaire, such as RanDShine or Francis Menotti, may be working on something new. Others may find
that Indianapolis is on their route to another show. IMM’s mission statement is to bring a variety of entertainment to Indy and to provide a friendly venue in which magicians can perform.

It’s a real theater with lights and sound; there are no interruptions from servers during the performance. Patrick Thernes (aka Sir Pat-Trick) has found a home with IMM: “Taylor Martin has created a safe place for the performers with Indy Magic Monthly. When I was starting out, he allowed me to do my first real stage show there. He gives you the artistic freedom and the support that a performer needs. As I tell Taylor, ‘I’ll work for you anytime.’” But it hasn’t always been the well-oiled machine it appears today. There have been growing pains as Taylor learned how to be a producer.

Excited to have Theatre on the Square (TOTS) agree to rent him their theaters during down periods, Taylor set about promoting the show, printing T-shirts, and buying advertisements for what was then called Indy Monthly Magic. Just days before the first show opened on April 1, 2008, he received a cease-and-desist order. A well-established publication already had the name Indianapolis Monthly, and they believed that people would think that the magazine was sponsoring a magic show. The show hadn’t opened and it had already hit a major obstacle. After a simple name change and the absorption of the cost of promotional materials he couldn’t use, Indy Magic Monthly launched on April Fool’s Day as planned. If you go to indymagicmonthly.com, you’ll see Porcini the magical flying pig as the show’s mascot. Taylor thought that when pigs fly, there would be a show. Pigs do fly, as it turns out.

Read the entire story in the December issue of M-U-M by Clicking HERE.

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